Do politicians need to go to business school?

Channel 4’s breakdown of the careers of MP’s in June 2017 showed that 19% were career politicians, 14% were from business, 11% were lawyers, 8% finance and accounting and the rest were a very mixed set of occupations.

In fact more than a quarter of the candidates chosen by Britain’s political parties to fight in the 2010 general election had no experience of any career other than politics. And this was true in the 2015 general election when one in four (26 per cent) of new candidates contesting were political professionals source UCL and PCUK.

Going back to 1979, Nuffield election studies show no less than one in ten MPs from the three main parties have been barristers or solicitors. More recently research compiled by BPP University Law School has revealed that 119 of the 650 MPs in 2015 either studied or practised law before standing for election.

But it is clear that this isn’t what the electorate want.

A YouGov report in 2014 showed that voters would prefer if these trends were reversed. 57% wanted more factory workers elected to Parliament; 61% wanted more doctors (who made up only 1.4% of main-party MPs as of 2010) and 57% wanted more scientists.

Unsurprisingly, there is always a huge clamour for MP’s to come from less privileged backgrounds and indeed represent a wider societal view. However, there is way too little attention given to the need to have more people from business in Parliament.

A huge proportion of the issues that MP’s need to understand, debate and vote on relate to how organisations need to be run, how to improve efficiencies, leverage new ideas and technologies and motivate people. These issues are the bread and butter of business people.

So whilst the public may want more doctors and factory workers, actually we do need more business people before anything else, if we are going to solve the most pressing issues in our society.

Perhaps it’s time to train our MP’s to be better equipped to do their job. At least some of this training needs to be at a Business School or equivalent. Until then we shouldn’t be surprised if so many offices of state are poorly managed, and if too often politicians promise the earth and are unable to deliver it.